ACE In Space

 

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ACE

ACE EPAM Publications and Presentations Authored or Co-authored
by Fundamental Technologies Personnel

 

 

Publications

 

 

AGU Abstracts

 

Armstrong, T. P., and G. G. Holland, Particle Acceleration at Interplanetary Shocks Observed with the Electron and Proton Anisotropy Monitor on the Advanced Composition Explorer, Spring AGU Meeting, May 1998, 1998 Spring Meeting Supplement to EOS, S262, 1998.

 

 

 

Haggerty, D. K., R. Gold, S. M. Krimigis, S. E. Hawkins T. P. Armstrong, and G. G. Holland, Upstream Energetic Ion Events Observed by EPAM, Spring AGU Meeting, May 1998, 1998 Spring Meeting Supplement to EOS, S262, 1998.

 

 

 

Krimigis, S. M., R. E. Gold, D. K. Haggerty, S. E. Hawkins II, T. P. Armstrong, and L. J. Lanzerotti, Early Results From the Electron, Proton and Alpha Monitor Instrument (EPAM) on the ACE Mission, Spring AGU Meeting, May 1998, 1998 Spring Meeting Supplement to EOS, S261, 1998.

 

 

 

Gold, R. E., D. A. Lohr, D. K. Haggerty, S. M. Krimigis, T. P. Armstrong, and L. J. Lanzerotti, First Observations from the Electron, Proton, and Alpha Monitor (EPAM) on the ACE Spacecraft, Abstract SH52C-06, Fall AGU Meeting, December 1997, 1997 Fall Meeting Supplement to EOS, F562, 1997.

 

 

 

 

For more EPAM publications, please visit the APL ACE EPAM website.

 

 

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Updated 1/2/19, Cameron Crane

MISSION ELAPSED TIME

*Since official launch
August 25, 1997, 14:39 UTC

QUICK FACTS

Manufacturer: Johns Hopkins APL built and operates the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) and its instruments

Mission Duration: 5 years were originally planned, 20+ years have elapsed.

Destination: The L1 Lagrangian point between the Earth and the Sun (1.5 million km away from the Earth)

Orbit: ACE's orbit is a Lissajous orbit near the L1 Lagrangian point between the Earth and the Sun.